Polio? Me? No, I Recovered from it as a Small Child

Thea had known that she had had polio in one leg as a small child but was unaware that the condition manifested in older age – for Thea this was in her late 60’s and early 70’s. However, once the post-polio effects were diagnosed, Thea understood the risks, and changes were made in her home to help her live with this ongoing and debilitating condition. …

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There are Differences That Need to be Recognised

In my case I have never seen myself as anything less than an Australian making my way and trying not to have to rely on others (including Government) until I really need to. In this I have been successful for over 60 years. My message is this … in the greater number of cases, people who have had polio have contributed to our country with limited call on the health system. Even in later years we continue to contribute BUT we may need some support and some of us may need more than others. …

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PPS is a Second Disability

In 1955 my mother and I contracted polio with devastating results. After we recovered from the acute phase of the illness we were both severely paralysed. My mother had no movement from the chest to her feet. I was a very small child (11 months) and so the polio went all over, with paralysis in all four limbs, predominantly on the right side of my body. …

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A Better Way

I am an Australian citizen from a pioneer family. I have a polio-related disability contracted when I was 17 and which kept me in hospital for 11 months and turned me out with braces on both legs. I am now 84 and have some post-polio symptoms plus the physical symptoms of aging on a disabled leg/back. I have 3 children, 8 grandchildren and 5 great-grandchildren, and the same wife for 57 years. …

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Systems Fail – Don’t Let Them Fail You!!

At 51 I feel fairly satisfied with my life with polio. My carer and I are ‘on the ball’ and I am a good advocate for myself. Despite this, it has taken 38 months to get new KAFO’s from the laughingly titled, ENABLE Program, here in NSW. I am a ‘young’ polio so I will benefit from the NDIS but if the same systems that support me now are involved, it will be a waste of time and money. …

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Blessings in Disguise

My name is Karree and my story begins in the year 1974 when I was born out of poverty in the Philippines. It always leaves me in wonder when I think of how little miracles happen and are still happening all around the world. One of those miracles was the day I was adopted into a beautiful family and began my life in Australia, worlds away from what my life could have been. …

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Diana’s Story

I contracted Polio in 1952, when I was two years old. I remember wearing a half brace on my right leg and noticing people staring at it. I do remember when I was told that I didn’t need to wear it any more – I asked my mother why people were still staring at my foot. I didn’t realise at that time that I walked with a limp – due to my right foot dropping quite substantially. From that time on, 10 years of age, I had to get used to constant staring. This is what hurt me most during my entire life. …

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Better Financial Support

The biggest issue that I have faced throughout my life is the added expenses that incur just to be able to function like an able-bodied person. What galls me even more is that I have worked full time since I was 18 and paid my share of taxes. In order to function each day I need a leg brace and modified shoes to walk. Because my feet are different sizes I need to purchase either made-to-measure shoes or buy two pairs of the same style shoe and discard the shoes I don’t need. Either way it is expensive. The government will fund one pair a year. How many able-bodied people use one pair of shoes a year? Why aren’t expenditures that enable me to go to work and earn a salary tax deductible? …

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Denial and Acceptance

I am a 76 year old Polio Survivor who is now struggling with the Late Effects of Polio. I spent up to two years in hospital during the years of WWII. At Camperdown Children’s Hospital I was in and out of iron lungs and always strapped in a frame. Later I was transferred by army jeep to a rehab centre at Collaroy Plateau. I vividly remember that trip across the Harbour Bridge as my travel buddy and I, strapped in our frames, began sliding out the back of the jeep!! …

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Fond Memories

I contracted polio early in 1964, when I was 6. I had received the full course of Salk vaccinations. I was in grade 2, and have no real memories of the time polio began affecting me. Apparently, I was beginning to dislike school, which was very unusual, as I had loved school. I had increasing difficulty walking to and from school. Mum began to worry one afternoon, when I hadn’t arrived home. She searched for me, and found me lying, crying in the gutter, unable to walk. I was eventually diagnosed with polio. It was an unusual case, as I had received my ‘polio shots’, and it was at the very end of the polio epidemic. …

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It Never Ends

I contracted polio in 1937 when I was two years old in both my legs. In spite of this I have managed to have quite an active life. I played golf until aged 70 and bowls up to my present age of 77. I don’t know how much longer I will be able to play bowls and indeed walk, as I feel the muscles in my legs growing weaker and find that I can’t walk on uneven ground, or up hill and down dale. …

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You Can Fulfill Your Life-long Ambitions with Polio

I was born in Johannesburg in the summer of 1953. I was an active child always running around at top speed. In fact the nurses in the hospital said I was going to be a racing car driver. At the age of 2 years I had to be admitted to Johannesburg General Children’s Hospital as I had worms from eating sand. Whilst in hospital I caught polio from a nurse who was a carrier. She had come down from the isolation ward to visit the children’s ward. …

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Angela Gill

For most of us, we were fully aware that our partners had experienced polio as children; however polio was not a factor in our blossoming courtships all those years ago. Now, as our polio-survivor partners face the increasingly unpleasant and unexpected symptoms of post polio syndrome and the late effects of polio, we, as their partners and supporters, are also coming to terms with the prospect of possible lifestyle changes ahead. …

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